Logan – Film Review

What’s it about?

Logan, a film directed by James Mangold and starring Hugh Jackman in the titular role, is the latest installment in the X-Men franchise.

Set in 2029 where mutants are almost extinct, we are introduced to a tired, grizzled and  older version of Logan who works as a limo driver in the Texas-Mexico border, earning enough to take care of Professor Xavier and another mutant called Caliban, who are in hiding. Their everyday lives in interrupted when they come across a young girl with mutant abilities who is being hunted by a big nameless corporation for their own nefarious purposes. How Logan and Professor X help this girl out is what the rest of the film is about.

What’s good?

This is by far the most bloody and emotional comic book film to come out in recent times. In a dark and desolate world where being a mutant is a crime, we get to see these last few mutants crave for some semblance of normalcy and a feeling of belonging to a place. This results in some poignant character moments in the film where the viewer feels for these characters and can understand the emotional roller-coaster that they have been through. Essentially a road trip film, it also has some of the best character development in comic book films, especially the relationship between Logan and Professor X.

    The action needs a special mention as it is bloody and gruesome, unlike the family friendly variety we have come to expect from the X-MEN franchise. Decapitation, shredding of limbs, blood spurting all over the place, this film has it all. The action set pieces are designed in a very realistic way without any big generic CGI explosions and this makes for a refreshing watch. Even the language is unlike any other comic book film, as in there is a lot of swearing and profanity.Thankfully all this feels organic to the story and does not feel gratuitous.

    As mentioned before, this film has a very indie movie feel to it without the customary bloated CGI set pieces, and this works in its favor. At times this feels like a regular action drama which just happens to have a mutant as the lead, and this approach really lets you invest in the story and the fate of the characters.Camerawork is excellent, capturing everything from the dirty atmosphere where the story takes place to the pained expressions on the characters faces well. Art work is also excellent, giving the viewer a completely immersive experience into the world where the story takes place.

What’s not?

The only minute flaw that this reviewer could find is that the film slows down considerably in the second half, especially in the final third act. This however does not take anything away from an amazing experience that this film is.

Performances

This is Hugh Jackman’s show through and through. He is the life of this film. As an older Wolverine who does not heal as fast as he used to, and as someone who has seen all his friends die around him, Jackman really brings out the pain in the character’s psyche and his physique. This is the perfect swan song for Jackman and the character that he has played for seventeen years. Patrick Stewart’s Professor X is a man who once was the most brilliant mind in the world, but is now old and senile and childlike, and is prone to seizures. And Stewart gives an absolutely riveting performance. Dafne Keen as the young mutant is very good in her role. She has some great bonding scenes with both Jackman and Stewart and manages to hold her own. Rest of the cast are all good in their respective roles.

Final Word

A gritty take on the Wolverine story makes this one of the best comic book films of all time and is a must watch.

Rating

4 / 5 stars


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